Monday, November 15, 2021

The Doug Ritter RSK® Mk5 Altoids Can Survival Knife is back for 2021

Photo courtesy of DougRitter.com

Hey friends, cool knife buy alert!

A couple of years ago, CRKT stopped production of the Doug Ritter RSK Mk5, a cool little "Fits into an Altoids Can" survival knife. 

For 2021, Smoky Mountain Knife Works has managed to bring them back into production. According to Doug Ritter, the knives are still made in the same factory as the original CRKT versions using the same exact steel, so the quality is identical. 

However, these knives now retail for HALF the price of the original CRKT versions, with a street price of just $11.99 at Smoky Mountain Knife Works as of this writing. 

You are not going to find another purpose built, Altoids Can sized fixed blade knife like this for even close to price. 

Ritter and his associates put a lot of work into developing this little knife for real world survival use back in the day, which can read about at this link- http://www.dougritter.com/rsk_mk5.htm  

I've owned the CRKT version for many years and love it.  

Aside from the fact that this knife is such a great accessory to your micro-survival kit, buying one also helps fund Doug's KnifeRights.org, which is on the front lines battling for your right to own and legally carry knives around the country. 

Cheers,

Jason

About the author
Jason Schwartz is the Founder and Senior Editor of Rocky Mountain Bushcraft. He is an Army veteran, former Red Cross certified Wilderness & Remote First Aid Instructor, and the author of Edible & Medicinal Survival Plants of the Rocky Mountains Pocket Guides. Jason has also written articles on bushcraft and survival for The New Pioneer and Backpacker Magazine Email him at rockymountainbushcraft @ hotmail.com (without spaces)

Friday, October 29, 2021

REVIEW: Winchester AA 12 Gauge International Target #7.5 Birdshot Shells- Ultralight Shotgun Shells for Survival Guns


Back in March of 2017, I reviewed Aguila's Ultralight 12 Gauge #7.5 Mini Shells shotgun shells as an option for survival use.

Aguila's Mini Shell is basically a shrunken down 12 Gauge shotshell (only 1 3/4" long) that is extremely light (as light as a 410 shell), yet still throws excellent patterns. 

As great as the little Mini Shell was, it suffered from one major drawback -- price. At roughly $20 for a box of 20 shells, Aguila Mini Shells are more expensive than most 12 Gauge High Brass loads. 

For the budget-minded backcountry trekker, this could be a real deal breaker, especially if you want do a lot of target practice with them.

So I set out in search of an alternative that would give similar performance to the Mini Shells without breaking the bank.

After a bit of searching online, I came across Winchester's 12 Gauge AA 2 3/4" #7.5 International Target Load, which is essentially a 7/8 ounce version of Winchester's popular AA Super Sporting Clays 1 1/8 ounce load. The Winchester AA International Target loads are generally $11-$13 for a box of 25 when you can find them online, so they are roughly half the price of the Aguila MiniShells. 


The SPECS

Winchester's AA International loads are used mainly for international skeet and trap competitions. Moving at a blazing 1,325fps, they feature hardened shot, a high strength hull, AA wads for improved pattern performance, reloadable brass shells, and what Winchester claims is the best in class primer and powder for reliability in the field.  


Winchester AA International 2 3/4" 12 Gauge Target Shells vs Winchester AA 20 Gauge Super Sport 7/8oz Shells

At only 26.1 ounces per 20 shells, the 12 Gauge AA International Loads are nearly as light as 20 shells of Winchester AA #7.5 20 Gauge Super Sport Shells - impressive.

20 shells of Winchester's AA International weighs only 26.1 ounces:

That is only once ounce more than Winchester's 20 Gauge AA 7/8th Ounce Shells:


The real question is, how well do they perform? Light loads often mean thin patterns, so I was curious to see what the patterns looked like on some rabbit, squirrel and turkey targets.

FIELD TEST

25 Yards from an H&R/NEF Pardner Single Shot Shotgun with a Modified Choke on a rabbit target:


25 Yards from an Stoeger Double Barrel Coach Gun Shotgun with an Improved Choke on a rabbit target:


35 Yards from an H&R/NEF Pardner Single Shot Shotgun with a Modified Choke on a Birchwood Casey splattering squirrel target:


35 Yards from an Stoeger Double Barrel Coach Gun Shotgun with an Improved Choke on a Birchwood Casey splattering squirrel target:


Even at 50 yards, the AA International load still produced enough of a pattern out of the H&R/NEF Single Shot to have multiple hits on this squirrel target:


35 Yards from an H&R/NEF Pardner Single Shot Shotgun with a Modified Choke on a Birchwood Casey splattering turkey target:


FINAL THOUGHTS

As shown in the field tests above, the Winchester AA International 12 Gauge Shells performed excellent. They give up very little in pattern density to heavier 1oz and 1 1/8oz shells. 

Although not as super ultralight as the tiny Aguila MiniShells, whatever they lose in weight advantage to the MiniShells, they make up for with superior velocity and harder, deeper penetrating shot. 


This makes Winchester's AA 12 Gauge International Target Shells an excellent ammo choice for bush pilots, snowmobiler's, ATV'ers, canoeists and other backcountry adventurers who like to pack a shotgun and keep their pack weight to a minimum. 

5 out of 5 Stars (Highly Recommended)


About the author
Jason Schwartz is the Founder and Senior Editor of Rocky Mountain Bushcraft. He is an Army veteran, former Red Cross certified Wilderness & Remote First Aid Instructor, and the author of Edible & Medicinal Survival Plants of the Rocky Mountains Pocket Guides. Jason has also written articles on bushcraft and survival for The New Pioneer and Backpacker Magazine Email him at rockymountainbushcraft @ hotmail.com (without spaces)

Wednesday, October 27, 2021

Wilderness Survival: Eat Crow Readers!


Have you ever eaten a crow? I have! Back in 2014, I decided to put my money where my mouth is so to speak. I wanted to know -- if Crow were the only meat available in a survival situation, would it be barf-o-rama, or would it be tolerable? So....in the spirit of educating myself in order to share the experience with you, I ate crow.....


Into the pot it goes - yuck!


Crow are carrion feeders, so I had to boil it for 30 mins straight to ensure that no bad microbes remained. Shown here is the Crow after it had been fully cooked:
 

Unfortunately, a huge thunderstorm rolled up and a dropped a ton of rain right after I took this photo, so I had to huddle up in a tent and eat the Crow and was not able to take any more photos. Suffice it to say, I was quite surprised by the way it tasted!


About the author
Jason Schwartz is the Founder and Senior Editor of Rocky Mountain Bushcraft. He is an Army veteran, former Red Cross certified Wilderness & Remote First Aid Instructor, and the author of Edible & Medicinal Survival Plants of the Rocky Mountains Pocket Guides. Jason has also written articles on bushcraft and survival for The New Pioneer and Backpacker Magazine Email him at rockymountainbushcraft @ hotmail.com (without spaces)

Monday, May 3, 2021

Buck Knives releases S35VN version of the Classic 119 Special

 
Photo credit: Buck Knives ©2021

Buck Knives has just released a super groovy version of their classic 119 Special in S35VN Supersteel. Called the 119 Special Pro, the knife includes an eye-pleasing green canvas micarta handle, black leather sheath, and a polished nickel silver guard and pommel. 

Photo credits: Buck Knives ©2021

For more information visit: https://www.buckknives.com/product/119-special-pro-knife/0119GRS1-B/

Cold Steel Discontinues the Outdoorsman Lite Knife

 

Photo credit: Rocky Mountain Bushcraft ©2021 All Rights Reserved

Right as Cold Steel perfects the Outdoorsman Lite, they discontinue it....


Sad news for fans of Cold Steel's Outdoorsman Lite. Cold Steel has discontinued the knife and removed it from their website. I was able to confirm this directly from Cold Steel's customer service department recently.

This is a shame, because in its most recent iteration (the 2021 model), Cold Steel finally perfected the Outdoorsman Lite, turning it into one of the best wilderness survival blades on the market for the money.

Photo credits: Rocky Mountain Bushcraft ©2021 All Rights Reserved

With an average street price of just $28.00, the Outdoorsman Lite is packed with cool features that make it wilderness-friendly. 

It sports a 6" long, 4mm thick blade, full tang construction, an exposed tang at the butt end of the grip, a robust tip capable of handling bushcraft and wilderness survival tasks, a 90 degree spine capable of striking a firesteel, a comfortable and secure rubberized grip, and a sub-zero cryo quenched German 4116 Stainless blade (a fine-grained stainless that is similar to Mora's 12c27 Stainless in performance). All in a package that weighs just 8.3 ounces total with the sheath. 

(Photo courtesy of Cold Steel)

Photo credit: Rocky Mountain Bushcraft ©2021 All Rights Reserved

The evolution of the Outdoorsman Lite -- 2011 to 2015

When Cold Steel first released the Outdoorsman Lite back in 2011, it came with a thinner 3mm thick blade and weighed only 5.2 ounces without the sheath. The original sheath consisted of cordura nylon. Although it was capable of being used for survival purposes, this lack of blade thickness made some Cold Steel fans shy away from buying it for serious wilderness use.

Vintage photo courtesy of eBay

2016 - New Polymer Sheath

Starting in 2016, Cold Steel replaced the original cordura nylon sheath with a Mora-esque polymer sheath:

Photo credits: Rocky Mountain Bushcraft ©2021 All Rights Reserved

Unfortunately, this sheath, which has been used on the Outdoorsman Lite until this year, was too secure and lacked a thumb ramp, making the knife difficult to draw from the sheath. Thankfully, this issue was fixed in the 2021 model (see below).

2019 -- Blade Thickness Increased from 3mm to 4mm

In 2019, Cold Steel increased the thickness of the Outdoorsman Lite's blade from a thinner 3mm wide to a very respectable 4mm, roughly the same thickness as a Marine Kabar Knife. The tip was also widened during this change. 

Photo credits: Juraj Čikkel from the Cold Steel Nation Facebook Forum. All Rights Reserved. © Juraj Čikkel 2021

This is also resulted in a tip that is more robust than Cold Steel's SRK model (SRK on the right, Outdoors Lite on left):

Photo credit: Rocky Mountain Bushcraft ©2021 All Rights Reserved

This change also increased the weight of the blade itself from 5.2 ounces to 6.5 ounces.

Here is a comparison of the 2021 4116 Stainless Outdoorsman Lite and 2020 4034SS Stainless Outdoorsman Lite next to a Kabar Marine Fighting Knife and a vintage Cold Steel SRK in AUS8:

From Left to Right: Marine Kabar, 2021 Outdoorsman Lite in 4116, Cold Steel SRK, 2020 Outdoorsman Lite in 4034SS. 

Note that the tip is thicker on the 2020 model 4034SS Outdoorsman Lite than on the 2021 4116 Stainless version. 

 2020 -- Blade Steel changed from German 4116 Stainless to Japanese 4034SS Stainless

Photo credit: Rocky Mountain Bushcraft ©2021 All Rights Reserved

In 2020, Cold Steel changed the steel from German 4116 to 4034SS Stainless, a steel that Cold Steel describes as "A Japanese made medium grade stainless steel that admirably resists corrosion due to its higher Chromium content. It is also relatively easy to sharpen and features a moderate degree of wear resistance. Often it is used for kitchen cutlery or for smaller knives that are of a generally good quality but are economically price."

One of the curious differences between the 2020 4034SS Outdoorsman Lite and the 2021 4116 version is the level on polish between the two. The 4116 Outdoorsman Lite is (bottom) clearly more polished and with darker lettering than the 4034SS Outdoorsman Lite (top):

Photo credits: Rocky Mountain Bushcraft ©2021 All Rights Reserved

The 4034SS version has more of a polished matte finish whereas the 4116 has a bright, mirror polish that is even more noticeable in person. 

Because Cold Steel only changed to 4034SS for one year and then went back to 4116, most online knife stores have had difficulty in correctly labeling their listings for this knife. From my recent experience, anything that is labeled as either steel will actually be the 2021 4116 German Stainless version, not the 4034SS. 

The only place to my knowledge that is still selling the 4034SS version is Midway USA, which is selling the factory second version of it. These were probably sold in low numbers, so if you can still find one, they may become collectible at some point. 

Changes to the 2021 Outdoorsman Lite - Perfection at last

For 2021, Cold Steel corrected the sheath problem by making it easier to draw. I would compare the draw of the 2021 sheath to be similar to my Mora knife sheaths. In other words -- very good overall. 

The other major change for 2021 was switching back to German 4116 Stainless and giving the blade a mirror polish. 

Photo credit: Rocky Mountain Bushcraft ©2021 All Rights Reserved

The edge geometry is also excellent on the 2021 Outdoorsman Lite. I did a direct comparison of its wood carving capabilities next to a 2021 Cold Steel SRK in SK-5 Steel recently. I found the Outdoorsman Lite to be notably superior to the SRK. Whereas the SRK was only adequate for wood carving, the Outdoorsman Lite excelled. So good that I would compare it as being close in performance to some of the Swedish Mora knives in my collection.

Final Thoughts

I don't think the cat is out of the bag yet that the Outdoorsman Lite has been discontinued. If I were you, I would grab up one of these cool and unique knives while you can. With its features and light weight, and a tip that's thicker than Cold Steel's SRK, this knife would make an excellent mountain survival, bushcrafting and hunting knife. 

4.5 out of 5 Stars -- Highly recommended

So what do you think? Was it the right time for Cold Steel to discontinue the Outdoorsman Lite? Will other classic Cold Steel knives end up on the chopping block soon? Leave a comment below!


About the author
Jason Schwartz is the Founder and Senior Editor of Rocky Mountain Bushcraft. He is an Army veteran, former Red Cross certified Wilderness & Remote First Aid Instructor, and the author of Edible & Medicinal Survival Plants of the Rocky Mountains Pocket Guides. Jason has also written articles on bushcraft and survival for The New Pioneer and Backpacker Magazine Email him at rockymountainbushcraft @ hotmail.com (without spaces)

Monday, April 12, 2021

Photos missing from certain posts

Hey friends, Jason here. Just an FYI that during my absence, Google blogger removed or disabled some of my photos from certain reviews. These are photos that are copyrighted to me, so it does not appear that they were removed because of a perceived copyright violation, but because Blogger is an older program that has some bugs in it. As such, I am going to have to spend time re-uploading many of these photos to fix the issue. 

Thanks for your patience!

-Jason

Sunday, April 11, 2021

So where has Jason been?.......

Friends, it's great to see you again and thank you for continuing to support RMB with your comments during my long absence. Unfortunately, I got a bit sidelined after some of my military injuries caught up with me. So I had to spend some time at the VA getting evaluated/service-connected as well as doing some physical therapy/exercises before I could come back to Rocky Mountain Bushcraft.
 
I am more limited now in what I can do because of my service injuries, but the good news is, as long as I stay within those limitations, I can return to sharing my adventures with you about wilderness survival skills, bushcrafting, tips & tricks and knife reviews. In fact, I am looking forward to figuring out how to do more with less gear, doing it on a budget, and sharing all of those juicy details with you.

Stay tuned!

-Jason