Monday, April 30, 2012

WINNER Selected- KNIFE GIVEAWAY Light My Fire/Mora Swedish Fireknife & Tinder on a Rope


UPDATE- Winner selected!

Hi Everyone,

We had 49 people sign up for the giveaway, and #25 was selected by Random Number Generator. To that person, congratulations!. If you signed up but didn't verify your email as instructed, we did not count your entry (sorry). We look at unverified emails as potentially fraudulent/spam, so we have to make sure they are verified.

I decided after posting the giveaway to also create a drawing for five consolation prizes for those who didn't win the FireKnife. The prizes are Colorado Douglas Fir Fatwood Tinder Sticks that I harvested and made myself. These are similar in quality to Light My Fire's Tinder on a Rope, except that they were extracted locally from the Rocky Mountains and hand carved with a Wetterlings Hatchet and Mora knife. 

(click to enlarge)

Douglas Fir is considered to have the most flammable resin of all North American conifer trees. It is also quite rare to find compared to other varieties of fatwood. Each stick has an attached piece of climbing cord so that they can be attached to your pack, caribiner or belt loop. Makes a great tinder for starting fires, since fatwood is waterproof and will ignite and burn even when wet. Plus, it has a great smell to it!

Here's the original piece the sticks were harvested from:

(click to enlarge)

By Random Number Generator,
the consolation prize winners are #26, #15, #24, #33, #7. Please check your email as the winners will be notified immediately after this posting. Please make sure to check your spam folder!

NOTE: If you are the main winner or one of the consolation winners you have 7 days to respond. If we don't hear from you another winner will be selected. thanks!

We will be doing lots more giveaways in the future, so please check back often!

Cheers,

Jason



Dear readers,

We are giving away one brand new Light My Fire/Mora Swedish Fireknife (black) and one Light My Fire Tinder on a Rope (a piece of excellent Montezuma Pine Fatwood). If you haven't seen our review of the FireKnife yet, check it out here. The winner will be chosen by random number generator on Monday, April 30th, 2012.

To enter, simply Sign up for Rocky Mountain Bushcraft email updates at the top right-hand corner where it says "Follow By Email." You must also activate this subscription after you receive the verification for signing up in your email inbox. Unverified subscriptions will not be counted!

NOTE: We do not share emails with third parties or advertisers. They are only used to notify you of new postings at Rocky Mountain Bushcraft. (thanks)

We will pick the winner by choosing one of these emails by Random Number Generator on Monday April 30th. Anyone signing up between today and Sunday April 29th is eligible. There is no cost and the items will be shipped to the winner free of charge via USPS w/ tracking.  RULES: Must be 18 years old, live in the United States and be legal to own this knife. Must not be an employee of Industrial Revolution.

Please make sure to check your email (including your junk email folder) after the drawing ends as we will be notifying the winner by email.

Cheers!

Rocky Mountain Bushcraft


VIDEO: Safe and Efficient Axe Use- Small trees

Another great video from Ben Piersma of Ben's Backwoods showing how to safely fell small trees with an axe.

Sunday, April 29, 2012

Behind the scenes look at our gear testing- Dave's greatest hits!


Here's the "lighter side" of our gear testing........!

When Dave gives me a hard time about how long it's taking to do our waterproof testing during gear reviews, I make him sit in the lake just a "little" longer!


Hey is that Del Gue from Jeremiah Johnson? No, wait, it's Dennis Hopper from Easy Rider batoning wood!


Luke! I am your FATHER!


Luke! I'm your father, and I need you to give me a lot more free gear for making me stand here during these boring photo shoots!


When Dave gets tired of gear testing, he protests by laying down and taking a snooze:

Saturday, April 28, 2012

"Made in the USA" Gear Review: Ibex Wool Balaclava

Ibex's Merino Wool Balaclava makes a great 3-season head and neck warmer. It's a bit on the light side for deep winter excursions, but we did enjoy its comfort and fit on less extreme days. At only 2.1 ounces, it's definitely light enough for most anyone's pack and comes in handy for chilly spring weather in the mountains.

Although it's well constructed, we didn't have enough time to spend with the Ibex to predict long-term durability. It feels as if it should last for many seasons of outdoor trekking if properly cared for though.


The SPECS:
  • 18.5 micron New Zealand Merino
  • One size
  • Flatlock seams
  • 230 g/m 2 mid-weight interlock
  • Weight: 2.1 oz


Dave and I tested the balaclava on several winter and early spring gear-testing excursions, and we both came away impressed. As long as the balaclava was used within the limitations of its thinner material, it kept us warm and felt comfortable, even for extended periods.

The Merino wool is soft and stretchy and never made either of us itch. My favorite use for it was as a head and neck warmer while sleeping in the backcountry at night. For comfort, I like to have my head at least partially exposed while in my sleeping bag, and the Ibex worked well because it didn't feel like I was being suffocated or that I had too much bulky, uncomfortable material around my head.

Best of all, this balaclava costs the same as most foreign-made balaclavas yet is made in California USA. Highly recommended.

For more info visit or to purchase this product directly from Ibex visit: http://shop.ibex.com/Apparel/Mens-Ride/Balaclava

About the author
Jason Schwartz is the founder and senior editor of Rocky Mountain Bushcraft. He is a former Red Cross certified Wilderness & Remote First Aid Instructor, and has taught bushcraft and wilderness survival techniques to the Boy Scouts of America, interned with the US Forest Service, and studied wilderness survival, forestry and wildland firefighting at Colorado Mountain College in Leadville, Colorado. Jason has also written for magazines such as The New Pioneer and Backpacker, including writing the "Tinder Finder" portion of Backpacker's "Complete Guide to Fire," which won a 2015 National Magazine Award (NMA). Email him at rockymountainbushcraft @ hotmail.com (without spaces)

Friday, April 27, 2012

VIDEO: Ray Mears- How to Split Wood with just a Folding Saw

Another great video from British bushcraft expert Ray Mears. This trick really works but does take some practice. I've used this technique in the mountains during cold, wet, backpacking trips to get to dry inner wood to build a fire. It's great to know in case you loose your survival knife or can't take the weight of a hatchet or an axe in your pack.

video

Thursday, April 26, 2012

Improvised First Aid Trick: Use honey to treat mild burns



A honey-impregnated gauze pad is an effective improvised covering for mild burns. It has the ability to reduce infection and promotes healing of the wound. According to Wikipedia, "A review in the Cochrane Library suggests honey could reduce the time it takes for a mild burn to heal — up to four days sooner in some cases. The review included 19 studies with 2,554 participants."

Additional Reference:

A Comprehensive Guide to Wilderness & Travel Medicine, 3rd Edition by Eric A. Weiss M.D.

About the author
Jason Schwartz is the founder and senior editor of Rocky Mountain Bushcraft. He is a former Red Cross certified Wilderness & Remote First Aid Instructor, and has taught bushcraft and wilderness survival techniques to the Boy Scouts of America, interned with the US Forest Service, and studied wilderness survival, forestry and wildland firefighting at Colorado Mountain College in Leadville, Colorado. Jason has also written for magazines such as The New Pioneer and Backpacker, including writing the "Tinder Finder" portion of Backpacker's "Complete Guide to Fire," which won a 2015 National Magazine Award (NMA). Email him at rockymountainbushcraft @ hotmail.com (without spaces)

Tuesday, April 24, 2012

REVIEW: Leatherman Charge AL- Multi-Tool for Wilderness Survival?


Leatherman says that this is THE tool to have if you're stranded on a remote island. Personal preferences will vary, but from my experience and having seen Les Stroud use a similar Leatherman Wave on his Survivorman shows, I'd say they probably aren't too far off the mark.

Les Stroud using a Leatherman during his "Lost at Sea" episode


From a survival standpoint, it has almost everything you need in one tool. A one-hand opening, 2.9" blade made of Crucible's excellent 154CM stainless. A wood saw that rivals the efficiency of Victorinox's vaunted Swiss Army knife saws. A two-sided file-- one side for shaping wood, and the other side a diamond file for shaping, repairing and sharpening metal, glass or ceramics. Small, yet stout scissors. A serrated blade in 420HC stainless for cutting rope and plastics, and a can opener that can double as a crude awl if needed.  

The best thing is that all the tools lock when unfolded, so no worries about having them fold over on your fingers the way non-locking blades can. The flat head and phillips screwdrivers are also nice when you need to adjust/repair hand tools or firearms.

Features:
  • Quick-release Lanyard Ring
  • Removable Pocket Clip
  • 100% Stainless Steel
  • 6061-T6 Hard-anodized Aluminum Handle Scales
  • All Locking Blades and Tools
  • Leather or Nylon Sheath
  • 25-year Warranty
  • BIT KIT: Phillips #1-2 and Screwdriver 3/16", Screwdriver 1/8" and Torx #15, Hex 5/32" and 9/64", Hex 1/8" and 7/64", Hex 3/32" and 5/64", Hex 1/16" and .050", Square Drive #2 and #3, Phillips Eyeglass Screwdriver and Flat Tip
Measurements:
  • 2.9 in | 7.37 cm (blade length)
  • 4 in | 10 cm (closed)
  • 8.3 oz | 235 g
 Features

The Charge came with a Leather\Cordura sheath which I found both attractive and functional. It has a handy elastic LED flashlight holder in the side that can also hold a small keyring magnesium firestarter. The sheath also allows for the Charge to be carried in the opened position, perfect for when you need to grab the pliers quickly while fishing.

(click to enlarge)

The Charge also comes with a bit set which includes an assortment of Hex, Torx, Square and Flathead bits (see the specs above for more info). The sheath also has a convenient mini-pocket for the bit set to fit into as well. It was a bit difficult to get it in and out of the pocket at first but it loosened up fairly quickly.

(click to enlarge)

Leatherman includes both a detachable pocket clip and lanyard ring for the Charge as well:



I used this same factory pocket clip on a Leatherman Wave for years and it worked really well. I never had a problem with it coming loose and it always held the tool securely inside my pocket.

It does seem that the clip on the Charge makes it ride slightly higher in the pocket than the Wave, so this is a minor negative. I want to emphasize "minor" though, since it still functioned great on the Charge and compares favorably to the pocket clips on quality folders like Spyderos and Benchmades.

As is standard on most full size Leathermans, the Charge has a Standard\Metric Ruler on the handle:

(click to enlarge)

Field Testing 

To test the Charge, I left my trusty Mora knife at home and took the Leatherman instead during a weekend backpacking trip in late March. The trip took us to one of my favorite bushcrafting spots-- to the top of a beautiful Lodgepole Pine covered 10,000 foot mountain located out in the Roosevelt National Forest.

Even in March, it's still a cold, rugged and snowy place, so this makes it a great testing ground for gear. I was carrying an axe for chopping and splitting, so I didn't need a stout knife for those tasks, and I thought the Charge's diamond file would come in handy for keeping the axe sharp.

The view while backpacking up the mountain:
(click to enlarge)

View of Longs Peak from our encampment near the top:
(click to enlarge)

Main Blade

The photo below shows me carving a feather stick with the main blade. The grind is a modified full flat grind and actually carves quite well. Leatherman did a really good job on the blade's heat treatment, as it held an edge yet was still easy to sharpen in the field. In fact, edge retention was noticeably better than any of the 420HC blades on other Leatherman's I've used in the past. Kudos to Leatherman for choosing 154CM to use on the Charge.

Another thing I noted when carving was the comfort of the handle. The Charge's handles are housed in a hard-anodized, T-6 aluminum alloy and have a softer, more comfortable feel when compared to the Leatherman Wave's angular, sharper, all stainless handle. This makes the Charge a little more comfortable for wilderness use.

In fact, the main reason I didn't like the Wave for pure woods use was because it wasn't very comfortable for me during long carving sessions. In this respect, I found the Charge much more friendly to my hand during extended use in the backcountry.

(click to enlarge)

File

Using the diamond file to sharpen my Hudson Bay axe:
(click to enlarge)

Wood Saw

The wood saws on Leathermans are quite efficient. On average, they seem to perform as well as the saws on my Victorinox Swiss Army knives, which I consider the benchmark for this category. 

The photo below shows me cutting a shelter-sized pole with the saw. This saw helps to balance out the advantage a larger fixed blade usually has in wood processing. In a pinch, this saw can also be used to make wooden wedges and a baton which can then split small logs if needed (an article for another day!).

(click to enlarge)

Pliers

Even the needlenose pliers are handier than you would think in a wilderness situation. They can be used, for instance, to pick up a hot pot off of the fire, help adjust or loosen frozen snowshoe straps, remove stubborn fish hooks, and help undo difficult knots. It's really up to your imagination.

 Using the pliers to undo a stubborn leather snow shoe strap:

Conclusion

I really like the way the Charge feels in the hand compared to my Leatherman Wave. If you're carrying a cutting tool in the wilderness, it needs to be comfortable or you could end up with a sore hand and blisters. I think the Charge is a better choice than the Wave in this respect. The Wave is still a great outdoors tool, but I think the Charge is more well rounded if you're going to use your multi-tool in the wilderness most of the time.

I also found that the tools on the Charge open more easily than the tools on the Blast or the Waves I've owned. I'm not sure if this is because of increased quality control since it's a more expensive model, but either way, it's a definite improvement.

Being a multi-tool, it won't chop and baton wood like a large fixed blade, but it has many features a fixed blade doesn't. The saw definitely makes up for some of the chopping ability it looses. Throw in the pliers, scissors, diamond file, screwdrivers and can opener and you have a tool that's great for both urban and wilderness survival. 

Criticisms? Yes - give us a real awl on this thing Leatherman! Replace the serrated blade with an awl and this would truly be an awesome survival tool. The main blade can easily handle all the cutting tasks, and I think the advantages of having a real awl in a wilderness scenario outweigh the advantages of having the secondary serrated blade. 

The other issue is the pocket clip rides higher in the pocket than on the Wave. It's not a dramatic difference, but it would be better if it fit the same as the Wave. Minor criticisms of course, but I thought I'd point these out.

Aside from the issues mentioned, I really like the Charge, and plan to start carrying it in place of my Leatherman Wave from now on. 

4.5 out of 5 Stars (Highly recommended)




About the author

Jason Schwartz is the founder and senior editor of Rocky Mountain Bushcraft. He is a former Red Cross certified Wilderness & Remote First Aid Instructor, and has taught bushcraft and wilderness survival techniques to the Boy Scouts of America, interned with the US Forest Service, and studied wilderness survival, forestry and wildland firefighting at Colorado Mountain College in Leadville, Colorado. Jason has also written for magazines such as The New Pioneer and Backpacker, including writing the "Tinder Finder" portion of Backpacker's "Complete Guide to Fire," which won a 2015 National Magazine Award (NMA). Email him at rockymountainbushcraft @ hotmail.com (without spaces)

Monday, April 23, 2012

VIDEO: Safe and Efficient Axe Use: The Felling Notch

This is a great video by Ben Piersma of Ben's Backwoods showing how to safely fell a tree with an axe. Proper axe use has been a dying art since chainsaws became popular in the 1940s and 50s, and there are not many people left who really know how to use them correctly.

With the recent resurgence in the popularity of axes, it's important to keep this knowledge alive so that newcomers can learn to use them efficiently and to reduce the potential for injury.

Outside of Bernie Weisgerber (author of "An Axe to Grind"), Mors Kochanski, Ray Mears and a few others, there are not many axe experts left. Luckily, a new younger generation of axe experts, like Ben, is starting to appear and they are helping to spread this knowledge and keep it alive for future generations.



Sunday, April 22, 2012

VIDEO: Ray Mears- How to Properly Use and Split with an Axe, Selecting an Axe


This video has been out for a while, but judging by the number of people still using dangerous and improper axe techniques on Youtube videos, etc, we thought we'd share it to encourage safety and proper form. It's a great video and Ray is one of the best in the field. Please Tweet this or share it on your Facebook!

video




Wednesday, April 18, 2012

Helko Outdoor/Camping Hatchet: First Impression



This is an initial review\first impression of Helko of Germany's Camping Hatchet from their Classic Line. If you're not familiar with Helko, please check our recent review of their Vario 2000 Convertible Axe, which also explains more about their company history.


Specifications
Drop Forged C45 Steel, RC 55-56
Ash Handle
Advertised head weight- 1.1lbs (actual weight about 1.4lbs)
Advertised Length- 13.8 inches (this one measured in at 14.25 inches)
Weight without sheath- 25.6 ounces (as measured on a digital postal scale)
Weight with sheath- 26.7 ounces
Price- $47.30
Warranty- 5 years
Country of Origin- Made in Germany 

The hatchet comes with a thin, riveted leather sheath along with a small foldout brochure which explains Helko's history, type of steel, and the 5 year warranty.
(click to enlarge)

The sheath has two belt loop slits 1.5 inches wide. I did try it on a thinner belt and it held the hatchet fairly secure, though only field testing will tell if it actually stays put when brushing against tree limbs and bushes, etc.

(click to enlarge)

Rear view of the sheath:
(click to enlarge)


The head comes highly polished, which is very unusual for a hatchet in this price range.
(click to enlarge)


Handle/Grain

The handle is made from Ash and the grain is definitely less than optimal, but not the worst I've seen either. On hatchets, grain direction is generally not as much of a problem as compared to axes, since they aren't subjected to as much force during the swing. The handle is also covered with a thin lacquer.


Alignment

The alignment on this hatchet is almost perfect, though the end of the handle was milled slightly uneven.
(click to enlarge)

A better shot of the alignment vs the end of the handle:


The head is pinned to the haft with a traditional wooden wedge and reinforced with a round metal wedge. There is a small gap at the front of the eye, but overall it seems to be held together securely.

(click to enlarge)



Size Comparison between other hatchets

Here's the Helko next to a rebranded Wetterlings Wildlife Hatchet. The Helko is 14.25" long compared to the Wetterlings which is 12.5". Helko lists the head as weighing 1.1lbs, but I think the weight is actually 1.4lbs, since it's 3 ounces heavier than the 1.25lb Wetterlings.

(click to enlarge)

 The Camp hatchet next to Helko's Vario 2000 Convertible Hatchet:

(click to enlarge)

 Edge Profile

The edge profile is slightly thicker than the Wetterlings, but not too bad either. Before field testing it, I plan to hit it with a file and sharpening stone to thin it out slightly. 
(Helko is on the left)
(click to enlarge)

 The overall profile looks good for splitting as well.

(click to enlarge)


 Conclusion



Helko's Camp Hatchet looks very promising for the price. A highly polished head, German quality and a 5 year warranty all for under $50 bucks. No, the sheath isn't that great, but for this price, most traditional hatchets don't even come with a sheath. Also, the handle is varnished, but luckily, it's thin and should come off with only 5 minutes worth of scraping with a knife (or sanding it off with sandpaper) if you want to put linseed oil on it instead. The edge will need some work to make it razor sharp, but the overall profile is good so it shouldn't take too long to bring it up to par.

For more info or to purchase this hatchet visit http://www.helkonorthamerica.com

About the author
Jason Schwartz is the founder and senior editor of Rocky Mountain Bushcraft. He is a former Red Cross certified Wilderness & Remote First Aid Instructor, and has taught bushcraft and wilderness survival techniques to the Boy Scouts of America, interned with the US Forest Service, and studied wilderness survival, forestry and wildland firefighting at Colorado Mountain College in Leadville, Colorado. Jason has also written for magazines such as The New Pioneer and Backpacker, including writing the "Tinder Finder" portion of Backpacker's "Complete Guide to Fire," which won a 2015 National Magazine Award (NMA). Email him at rockymountainbushcraft @ hotmail.com (without spaces)

Tuesday, April 17, 2012

Rocky Mountain Bushcraft: Just who writes this dang blog anyway?!

Dear readers,

I realize that we have been rather mysterious, at least as blogs go. You've probably been here and wondered "who the heck are these guys, and what makes them an authority on anything?" I'd like to use this post to introduce you to us and why we write this blog.


Jason, Founder of Rocky Mountain Bushcraft 

Hi everyone, I'm Jason, the founder of Rocky Mountain Bushcraft. I started this blog in December of 2011 after actively participating for several years at Bladeforums.com and BushcraftUSA forum. It was on these sites that I wrote lots of posts, articles and reviews on subjects ranging from axes and knives to wilderness survival. Though I enjoyed contributing, I also wanted more freedom in what I posted, so I started this blog.

I'm a Red Cross certified Wilderness & Remote First Aid Instructor, interned with the US Forest Service as a Forestry Technician, and studied Outdoor Recreation, Wilderness Survival and Forestry at Colorado Mountain College in Leadville, CO.

I originally became interested in bushcrafting at age 6 when I saw "Jeremiah Johnson" for the first time. Not long after, Grizzly Adams started as a weekly TV show (yes, I'm dating myself here!) and I would watch it every week, completely mesmerized.

Luckily I had a dad who was already into the outdoors, and though I didn't get to see him much (my parents divorced in the early 70s), he always took me fishing, hiking, camping and shooting whenever we spent time together.

Not only was he a Commando in the 82nd Airborne during the Vietnam War, he also looked a bit like Dan Haggerty from Grizzly Adams, so I always thought he was the coolest dad around!

In the photo below I'm practicing marksmanship with a BB Gun with my dad, before getting my own .410 Single Shot Shotgun the following year.


My Dad also bought me my first Victorinox Swiss Army knife when I was 8. That knife was probably the coolest present I ever got. Safe to say, I was hooked for life!

Pretty much the rest of my childhood was spent running around in the woods pretending I was Grizzly Adams. At some point as a teenager, I bought a used copy of Larry Dean Olsen's "Outdoor Survival Skills" and almost wore the cover off of it while trying out the stuff in the book!

Though originally an eastern boy, I was lucky enough to spend a year in Colorado at age 17, so I got to live out a dream by camping for weeks at a time in the Pike National Forest. I'd spend days on end practicing skills from Olsen's survival book, like making arrows from wild rose bush shafts, chipping obsidian, wrapping the feathers and arrowheads with natural sinew and gluing them together with boiled pine pitch.

I'd make bows from wild locust, rub animal grease on the staves and then leave them by a smoky fire to cure. I'd then make the string with natural sinew found from dead animal carcasses. I got so good at it that a couple of local tourist shops started buying them from me to resell to tourists!

A year later, I joined an Army Reserve unit that ended up becoming federally activated during the Gulf War. I was lucky enough to get some great training while serving, like attending US Army Wilderness Survival Training, Desert Warfare and Survival, Urban Warfare, etc.

Axes

Now that you know more about my background, you may still be wondering about my "axe credentials" and how I came to write about and review them.

It's simple. After the 2008 economic crash, money got tight, and I had to start using an axe to keep our Colorado homestead warm. My girlfriend, my stepson and I couldn't afford to run anything except the woodstove and we didn't even have the money to fix our broken chainsaw.

So I bought an axe and learned how to use it. My first axe was a Stihl Axe made by Ox-head. My second axe was a Fiskars 28" Pro Chopping axe. The Fiskars blew away the Stihl axe and made me realize what a good sharp axe could do. I literally chopped and split tens of cords of wood for a couple of harsh winters, so I had to learn fast about what worked and what didn't.

So there you have it!

I really appreciate all the traffic we've had since December (over 18,000 page views!) and want to thank you all for visiting. I do love to hear comments though, any comments, so please let me know what you think!

I might also add that we are very review-heavy right now because of my commitment to spreading the word about American-made outdoor gear. I will be posting lots of other articles about survival and bushcrafting after finishing my "Buy American" project though, so keep checking back!

Cheers,

Jason


Dave C, Review Assistant, Field Tester, Bushcrafting Comrade
































Hi, I'm Dave. Aside from keeping things on the humorous side while we're out field testing gear, I'm also the guy in many of the review photos. When I'm not helping Jason, I'm out giving tours in Rocky Mountain National Park or in the neighboring Roosevelt-Arapaho Forest.

I have 20 years of experience in survival and backpacking in the deserts and foothills of the Southwest as well as the Rocky Mountains. I'm also a trained Wildland Fire Fighter /E. M. T.

I've been a survival knife guy for most of my life, but lately I've become an axe fanatic and currently own a Gerber Camp Axe and a Fiskars X15 Chopping Axe. Luckily, Jason has a huge collection of traditional axes that I get to try out as well! I've also become a fan of Mora knives, with my favorite being the Mora Clipper and recently, the Mora Swedish FireKnife.

We work really hard to bring you the best articles and reviews and appreciate you stopping by.

Cheers!

Dave

Leah K- Rocky Mountain Bushcraft Editor- Hi everyone, I'm Leah, the editor of Rocky Mountain Bushcraft. I have a Journalism-Communications Degree from Point Park University in Pittsburgh, and though I have many years of experience in other fields, bushcrafting is new to me.

I've always enjoyed the outdoors and spent many afternoons exploring the woods as a child, building pretend "cabins" and picking blackberrys in the summer.

In high school I tried archery and loved it, but it was one of those skills that I didn't have a chance to use as an adult. I originally took this on as a favor to Jason but I found that it's really interesting! 

I got my first Mora survival knife recently and am excited to start putting it to good use learning bushcrafting skills for the first time! I'll let you know what I think and I'll keep you posted on my progress.

Thanks for joining us at Rocky Mountain Bushcraft, I'm excited to be part of this adventure!

Peace,
Leah